Stories of the Southwest

 
 

Elizabeth Hey
Published October 04, 2018

With attractions such as Native American pueblos, railroad history, architectural icons and construction feats, America’s Southwest offers groups something to suit everyone’s interests.

Groups interested in the arts, architecture or the environment will find Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West a fascinating stop in the Phoenix area. If your group is interested in touring New Mexico’s pueblos, it makes sense to start at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque.

Mountainous beauty surrounds Colorado Springs, Colorado, and the Broadmoor, one of the most historic resort properties in the West. In 2019, the Golden Spike National Historic Site will commemorate the 150th anniversary of the transcontinental railroad, which made travel possible from coast to coast.

Taliesin West

Scottsdale, Arizona

Creative inspiration can be found at every turn at Taliesin West in north Scottsdale, Arizona. Wright’s stunning winter retreat served as his architectural laboratory from 1937 until his death in 1959. Built and maintained almost entirely by Wright and his apprentices, it offers a glimpse into his personal life.

Wright’s meandering, one-story home snuggled into the desert landscape showcases his dedication to creating buildings in sync with their surroundings. Wright visited Arizona in 1927 when he was asked to consult on the design for the Arizona Biltmore Hotel and, in 1937, bought land to build his winter residence. Typical of many of Wright’s buildings, each nook and cranny of Taliesin West has a story and a reason for being.

The popular Insights tour highlights Wright’s private quarters and living room, his drafting studio and more. Tours can be custom tailored for prearranged groups of 15 or more. Groups should allow time for the well-stocked bookstore, which is continually filled with new gift items and focuses on the arts.

“Groups really enjoy coming to see something very different than what they might think of as Frank Lloyd Wright,” said Donna Yeaw, public access manager for Taliesin West. “This was his laboratory, which was never finished and is still being worked on today. The buildings are continually being tweaked to express Wright’s designs to the 100,000-plus guests who visit each year.”

www.franklloydwright.org/taliesin-west

Pages: 1 2 3